Interviews

Adam Byatt, Trinity

We catch up with Adam Byatt, chef-proprietor of Trinity, Clapham

What inspired you to become a chef?
It was a long time ago – options and were minimal for me. I loved the structure and stability kitchens offered me

What do you enjoy most about being a chef?
I still learn every day, no two days are the same and I get to do the thing I love most for a living which is a total luxury, it generally makes you the most interesting person at a dinner party!  

Name one ingredient you couldn't cook without
Salt, obviously. Otherwise, anchovies.

What is the most unusual cooking/preparation technique you use?
It’s the most basic and primitive actually. We churn our own butter from a cream sourced from an amazing supplier. We tend to steer away from kitchen wizardry and stick to principles such as cooking all fish and meat on the bone.

What is your favourite time of year for food?
Autumn – five out of six of my restaurants opened in October. The ingredients in autumn are robust and so life-affirming, they just stand up to my style of cookery very well.

What food trends are you spotting at the moment?
Simple, classical, less tasting menus, less Nordic, less fancy, better raw ingredients – all of which suit me, thank you very much.

If you could cook for anyone (past or present) who would it be and what would you cook for them?
My granddad, he passed away when I was very young – Reginald was a cook in the British army, it would be great to demonstrate to him the journey I have been on through food.

At the end of a long day, what do you like to cook?
I generally don’t eat when I get home after service, I am partial to a glass of red Burgundy, though. That’s food right?

Do you have a guilty junk food pleasure?
I love a good burger from time to time, there is a reason they are so popular, it’s a thing of beauty when done well.

And finally… tell us something about yourself that will surprise your diners.
I was vegetarian for five years when I was a teenager and a professional skateboarder until cooking came on the scene.